How It Should Have Ended—Criminal Edition

Many of you may be familiar with “How It Should Have Ended,” a YouTube channel that rewrites the endings of famous movies to resolve them in funnier (and usually, shorter) ways.

For a while now, I’ve been taking note the reactions of many families of violent criminals after their interactions with police officers or armed citizens. Sadly, many members make excuses for the crimes of their violent sons and brothers and cousins and grandsons. They blame police officers for acting exactly as they’ve been trained to do—using deadly force to neutralize threats to themselves and others. They criticize armed citizens for protecting the innocent. Basically, they justify the crimes of the people they love.

I thought I’d take a few minutes and catalog some of the ridiculously inappropriate reactions from people whose family members have committed horrible crimes. As a public service, I’ll make some suggestions regarding how these people should have reacted to the death and mayhem caused by their criminal flesh and blood.

Reading, Pennsylvania
November 5, 2013

William Medina

William Medina

Taylor De Carr

Taylor De Carr

Two armed, masked men entered Krick’s Korner, a Reading store, to rob it. An armed citizen saw what was happening and called 9-1-1, then confronted William Medina and Taylor De Carr with his legally possessed firearm.  When the two perpetrators threatened him with their own weapons, the citizen shot and killed them both. The entire incident was caught on videotape and witness accounts supported the legality of the armed citizen’s actions.

The family’s reaction:

“It’s not fair,” said Virginia Medina, mother of one of the dead criminals. “[William] had no right to lose his life over something that man could have called the police for,” said Medina. “[The armed citizen] took the law into his own hands and walked away scot-free.”

“How about if people just start running around here, policing the city on their own? How much worse is it going to get?” said Peter Ratel, Medina’s cousin. (Peter didn’t seem to have any worries about “how much worse” his neighborhood would become if criminals continue to rob with impunity.)

The family members said they are hurt by comments suggesting the alleged robbers were “thugs.” According to Medina, William was “no big hard criminal,” but rather a good family man who loved his young daughter. Robert De Carr was described by his sister, Taylor De Carr, as “a good kid.”

How it should have ended:

Virginia Medina: “I’m so sorry to have raised such a menace to society. Though we loved William very much and hoped to see him do something positive with his life, he chose to take what he wanted instead of working for it. The armed citizen who took his life was justified in protecting himself and his community, and should be commended for being a responsible person. We hope that other young people in our community will look on our son as an example of how not to live your life.”

Taylor De Carr: “As it turned out, my brother was a bad kid—more interested in taking selfies than in paying his own way. We will miss him, but the rest of civilized society will not.”

You can read more about this story here.

Indianapolis, Indiana
July 5, 2014

Major Davis

Major Davis

Police were called to 34th Street and Forest Manor in Indianapolis, where they found Major Davis, Jr., brandishing what they described as an AK-47-style “assault rifle.” Officers told him to drop the weapon and put up his hands. Instead, he began to shoot at them. The police returned fire. During the gun battle, bullets from Davis’ weapon hit IMPD Officer Perry Renn three times. One round pierced Officer Renn’s heart, and the officer died of his wounds at Eskenazi Hospital.

Davis is being tried for capital murder. Previous charges racked up by this paragon of virtue include possession of cocaine, dealing cocaine, possession of marijuana, dealing marijuana and possession of a handgun without a license. When police searched Davis’ house they found two loaded SKS rifles, money, marijuana, meth and meth-making equipment.

Not coincidentally, Davis’ father—Major Davis, Sr.—had a lengthy arrest record and served three years on drug charges. In 2003, he died of a heart attack after a scuffle with police as he fought to avoid being arrested for public intoxication. Not unpredicably, the family blamed Major Davis, Sr’s, death on the police.

The family’s reaction:

Pam Moornan, Davis’ grandmother, provided plenty of excuses for her grandchild’s criminal behavior. “He wasn’t a bad person,” she said. “His father was killed by IMPD. That is enough to hurt a person and scar him for life.” She continued: “I imagine he figured they were going to try and kill him. I mean, cause look what they did to his father.”

Another relative criticized the police for their tactics in dealing with a gun-wielding thug: “I don’t know how the police was shooting. I don’t know if they took concern of any kids running around.”

According to reports, another family member said “the tragedy may have been avoided if Officer Renn would’ve stayed at his car since he could see Davis had a gun.”

How it should have ended:

Pam Moornan: “Our family, through multigenerational disrespect for the rule of law, has caused the Indianapolis community an inordinate amount of trouble and grief. There is simply no excuse for the havoc that my son and my grandson have caused. The fault is entirely their own, though our lack of personal responsibility, work ethic and family values definitely contributed to the poor choices made by our various family members. There is no way we can make it up to the family of Officer Renn, who was killed in such a violent way by my good-for-nothing grandson. We will do what we can to raise our remaining grandchildren in such a way as to prevent future tragedies.”

You can read more about this story here.

Mobile, Alabama
November 12, 2014

Adric White

Adric White

While free on bail for robbing another business, 18-year-old Adric White armed himself, donned a mask and robbed a Family Dollar store. As the young man held a handgun to the store clerk’s head, an armed citizen witnessing the incident took action. He stepped in with his gun drawn and ordered the young man not to move. White responded by swinging his own gun at his armed challenger, who shot the robber several times. Luckily for White, he survived the five bullets. He appeared in court two months later, all patched up, to answer for five counts of first-degree robbery related to three separate crimes.

The family’s reaction:

This story made national headlines when a family member criticized the armed citizen, saying he should’ve minded his own business and “just left the store.”

“If his life was not in danger, if no one had a gun up to him, if no one pointed a gun at him—what gives him the right to think that it’s okay to just shoot someone?” The clueless relative continued: “You should have just left the store and went wherever you had to go in your car or whatever.”

How it should have ended:

Family member: “There’s no other way to put it. Adric is a thug and a criminal. Sure, he was cute as a little boy, but thanks to bad parenting and bad examples he’s turned into a lazy, no-account son of a bitch who got what was coming to him. He’ll never apologize for his crimes, so we’ll apologize for him. To the clerk held at gunpoint by our worthless family member, we hope you can regain some sense of normalcy after the terror you must have felt. To the armed citizen who stopped Adric from causing an even worse tragedy: next time, please use a higher caliber and aim for center mass. That way, nobody will have to deal with this piece of crap and his lousy attitude ever again.”

You can read more about this story here and here.

Wichita, Kansas
January 3, 2015

John Paul Quintero

John Paul Quintero

Police responded to a house after a man’s relatives called to report that a young man was drunk and threatening them with a knife. According to officers, 23-year-old John Paul Quintero refused to comply with lawful commands. After stepping towards the officers, one of them used a Taser on the young man. After that, he got up and moved toward the officers again, and “reach[ed] toward his waistband.” An officer shot Quintero twice with a .223-caliber rifle, then immediately called an ambulance. Quintero died half an hour later in a local hospital. His autopsy reported that the man had alcohol, methamphetamine and marijuana in his system at the time of his death.

The family’s reaction:

“He was like a big kid, he loved playing with all his cousins,” said Alina Quintero, the family’s designated spokesperson. “He wanted to travel the world and obviously he can’t do that now.”

In a written statement, Alina Quintero said, “Our family is devastated at the senseless killing of our family member. John Paul was a loving person, he was well liked by his friends and family and enjoyed spending time with his loved ones. He also enjoyed reading about the law in his spare time and felt that he needed know his rights. We called the police for help during an incident that had involved knives in the home and had since been resolved. This call was placed by his father, my uncle and by his aunt, who was no present at the home, for the safety of her daughter and to further de-escalate the situation so that everyone could make it home safely.”

“It wasn’t right for them just to kill him for no reason at all, like we called you for help and instead of coming to help us you destroyed us,” Alina said.

The Quintero family reportedly contacted Attorney Benjamin Crump, the incompetent ambulance chaser who represented the family of Trayvon Martin, to discuss how they could cash in on their son’s death. In September, the Quintero family requested $10 million in damages from the city, announcing that they would sue if their damands were not met.

How it should have ended:

Alina Quintero: “We loved John in spite of his many shortcomings. His problem with substance abuse was entirely his fault, but we wish we could have helped him more. Anyone who’s ever participated in a Tueller Drill knows that an attacker can cover 21 feet in about a second and a half, and it’s pretty clear that John was much closer than that to the officers who shot him. We understand that having to shoot an armed perpetrator can be traumatic for law enforcement. Our family expresses deep sympathy and understanding for the officer who was forced to do so.”

You can read more about this story here.

Pasco, Washington
February 10, 2015

Antonio Zambrano-Montes

Antonio Zambrano-Montes

Antonio Zambrano-Montes, an illegal alien and Mexican national, had served prison time previously after being convicted of assaulting a police officer. On February 10, a citizen called 9-1-1 to report an obviously impaired man throwing rocks at passing vehicles. Police responded and he then threw several softball-sized rocks at them. They tried unsuccessfully to engage the suspect with a Taser. When he “reached towards his waistband and re-extended his arms towards the officers,” police fired several shots, killing Zambrano-Montes. The incident was captured on video by a bystander. Though the suspect was later discovered to be unarmed, toxicology reports showed his blood tested positive for methamphetamines.

The family’s reaction:

The man’s family filed and then withdrew a $25 million suit against the city. In July they filed a suit for $4.8 million in damages.

According to Zambrano-Montes’ family lawyer, the assault “did not represent a threat of grievous bodily harm to anyone,” and his death was “totally unjustified.” The family repeatedly claimed the drug-using ex-con’s death was an “execution.” The family also said the man was suffering from depression.

A few hundred social justice warriors (SJWs) staged a protest against the police shooting. A Hispanic activist group, Consejo Latino, petitioned the Department of Justice to investigate the case as an incident of police brutality.

How it should have ended:

The family’s lawyer: “The Zambrano-Montes family would like to apologize to the city of Pasco and the State of Washington for being a net drain on social and law enforcement resources. As citizens of Mexico residing in the United States without permission, they admit that they have exactly zero right to criticize the law enforcement tactics of their host country. In fact, they acknowledge that law enforcement in their home country is utterly corrupt and could not be trusted to responsibly investigate such an incident. The remaining Zambrano-Montes family members will now take care of their affairs and return to Mexico, where they will attempt to make amends by doing what they can to fix their own broken country.”

You can read more about this story here.

Smyrna, Georgia
March 25, 2015

Nicholas Taft Thomas

Nicholas Taft Thomas

Nicholas Taft Thomas, 25, was convicted in 2014 of aggravated assault against a police officer, but managed to avoid serving time. When he violated his probation, police showed up at the Goodyear store where he worked. Spotting the officers arriving to serve his warrant, Thomas climbed into a customer’s white Maserati and began driving erratically around the building. As police tried to stop him, he steered the stolen car directly at officers. They fired at the vehicle, then broke out a window with bean bag rounds so they could be sure it was safe to pull Thomas from the car. He died from his wounds.

Thomas had a long police record, with charges and convictions that included assaulting an officer, eluding police, drug charges and receiving stolen property. Two years before his death, he was arrested in Atlanta on 16 traffic charges all tied to a single event.

The family’s reaction:

“He was jumping the curve trying to get away, which I know is illegal, but he didn’t kill anybody,” said Thomas’ father. “And from what I know, he’s not under a criminal warrant for murder, he’s not that type of kid.”

“My son was a lovable guy,” Thomas’ mother tearfully told reporters. “He was a lovable guy who’d do anything for everybody. He was kind of, he just loved cars, he loved his family. He’d just had a baby, not even five months old.”

How it should have ended:

Nicholas Taft Thomas’s mother: “Since the out-of-wedlock birth of my grandbaby, I hoped my son had made the necessary changes in his attitude and behavior to break free of the pattern of crime that characterizes so many in our family and neighborhood. Obviously, this wasn’t the case. We want to send a clear message to the young people everywhere: if police show up to arrest you, your best option is always to comply with their lawful commands quietly and without complaint. Acting aggressively toward police officers will only get you killed, as it did my criminal son.”

You can read more about this story here.

Lakewood, Washington
April 21, 2015

Daniel Isaac Covarrubias

Daniel Isaac Covarrubias

Police were summoned to a local lumberyard to investigate a complaint of a suspicious person. Two officers responded, and discovered 37-year-old Daniel Isaac Covarrubias hiding atop a large pile of lumber (25 feet high). Officers told the man to stay where he was until they could find a ladder for him to climb down. Ignoring them, Covarrubias reached into his pocket. Officers drew their guns and told him to put his hands up. Instead, he pointed an object at them. They opened fire, hitting the suspect several times. He died in the hospital due to his injuries. The object turned out to be a cell phone.

Just an hour before his shooting, Covarrubias had visited a local hospital, where he asked medical personnel to “take the cameras out of his eyes.” While there, he spoke to a social worker, incidating that he’d recently used methamphetamines and hadn’t eaten or slept in three days.

The family’s reaction:

Lanna Covarrubias, Daniel’s sister, said, “Even my own kids looked up to my brother. He was such a good person, you know when he was clean, he just had an addiction,” she said. “That’s separate from who he was, he wasn’t just some drug addict who wasn’t nothing.”

She added, “The police just shot him like he was garbage….. And they’re doing that to all our men, men that are struggling with addiction, struggling with mental illness.” “It was a pointless, senseless death. And he’s gone.”

How it should have ended:

Lanna Covarrubias: “My brother Daniel was mentally ill. Before the 1960s, it was much easier for families to get mentally ill family members institutionalized—for their protection and for the protection of society. Then the bleeding hearts of the ACLU and the American political left began suing institutions and government agencies, with the result being that today, most people who should be getting psychiatric treatment are now free to roam the streets, endangering themselves and others. Statistics point out that people with severe mental illness are between three and four times more likely to act out violently. We understood the threat that Daniel posed to himself and to our fellow citizens, but thanks to the leftists in America (who we have supported with our money and our votes), there wasn’t much we could do to help him.”

You can read more about this story here and here.

Hackensack, New Jersey
June 12, 2015

Raymond Peralta-Lantigua

Raymond Peralta-Lantigua

Rosalva “Rosie” Lantigua placed a call to Hackensack police, sobbing, “I have an emergency in my house, my son going crazy, he break the TV, he break everything in here, and started hitting me right now.” Dispatchers asked whether her son had a weapon. She responded that “right now he has a knife in his hand.” Police responded to the house in the Fairmount neighborhood to find 22-year-old Raymond Peralta-Lantigua outside, still armed with the knife. He threw a large rock at the police, hitting a patrol car. According to police, the young man then rushed the responding officers while brandishing what they described as a “kitchen cleaver.” After first attempting to retreat, officers shot Peralta-Lantigua. He was later pronounced dead at Hackensack University Medical Center.

The family’s reaction:

After the shooting, Peralta-Lantigua’s mother, the victim of assault at the hands of her own son, lectured police: “You’re here to help, not to kill.”

At a vigil held for Rosalva Lantigua’s dead son, a local pastor told the crowd, “Although it was Raymond this time, it could have been our own children. We pray that we stop this onslaught of killings in our community.” It’s not known whether he spoke out about children assaulting their mothers and threatening them with knives.

How it should have ended:

Rosalva Lantigua: “No matter how much you love a person, the law of cause and effect still applies. We all watch the news, so we understand what happens to unstable people who attack the police. I called the police to get help dealing with my drug-addled, violent son. He attacked me, so it was reasonable to assume that he might attack them as well. I’ll miss my son, but at the same time, we’re all now free from having to worry about his next violent outburst.”

You can read more about this story here.

Posted in Firearms, Political Correctness, Racial Politics